Event Title

Active Participation and Social Connectedness Among Adult Online Learners

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Background. There is increasing evidence that older and more active online learners show greater social connectedness and better transfer memory compared to younger learners (Gatz & Karel, 1993; Ransdell, 2010). Methods. In the present study, graduate health science students from 27 to 61 years of age were given a pretest, a measure of autonomy and confidence (Duttweiler, 1984), online instruction, and a posttest to assess transfer and rote memory for statistics and conflict resolution information. Four birth year cohorts were included: Millennials born in 1982+, generation X, born 1982-’71, younger boomers, 1972-’61, and older boomers, 1962-’51. Results. Millennial students showed poorer transfer memory and more autonomy than older students. Older boomers represented the most socially connected and were better at posttest transfer memory. Older boomers were also more active in the websites associated with the online courses. Conclusions. Active participation and social connectedness contributed to better learning. A model of online learning is presented that reveals the best moderators and mediators of knowledge acquisition. Grants. The authors would like to thank the NSU College of Allied Health and Nursing and the PFRDG award program for support of this research.

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Active Participation and Social Connectedness Among Adult Online Learners

Background. There is increasing evidence that older and more active online learners show greater social connectedness and better transfer memory compared to younger learners (Gatz & Karel, 1993; Ransdell, 2010). Methods. In the present study, graduate health science students from 27 to 61 years of age were given a pretest, a measure of autonomy and confidence (Duttweiler, 1984), online instruction, and a posttest to assess transfer and rote memory for statistics and conflict resolution information. Four birth year cohorts were included: Millennials born in 1982+, generation X, born 1982-’71, younger boomers, 1972-’61, and older boomers, 1962-’51. Results. Millennial students showed poorer transfer memory and more autonomy than older students. Older boomers represented the most socially connected and were better at posttest transfer memory. Older boomers were also more active in the websites associated with the online courses. Conclusions. Active participation and social connectedness contributed to better learning. A model of online learning is presented that reveals the best moderators and mediators of knowledge acquisition. Grants. The authors would like to thank the NSU College of Allied Health and Nursing and the PFRDG award program for support of this research.