Event Title

Many Eyes of Diabetes: Pilot Testing Culturally Competent Educational Materials for Underserved Populations

Start Date

12-2-2010 12:00 AM

Description

Objective. To pilot test culturally competent educational materials targeted at an underserved Haitian patient population with diabetes. Background. Culturally sensitive patient care to minority populations can potentially mitigate health care disparities. Methods. Patient education materials were created in English, French, and Creole. Ten subjects with diabetes who were fluent in Creole were recruited from the community. Participants were asked to (1) complete a demographic survey; (2) complete an oral preand post-test on knowledge about diabetes and the eye; (3) review a patient education video message; (4) read a patient education message or, at the participant’s request, have it read to them; and (5) answer questions about the cultural competency of the materials. A previous study of English speaking subjects served as the comparison group. Three optometric students of similar cultural background served as a focus group. Results. Ten female subjects with diabetes (mean age = 65 years) participated. Educational levels varied (6 ≤ 6th grade or equivalent, 3 secondary school; 1 College). Although the assessment of patient knowledge revealed misconceptions about diabetic eye disease, there were no significant differences between the study population and the comparison group (p > 0.05). Three dominant themes emerged from focus group feedback: (1) literacy; (2) patient-centered care; and (3) cross-cultural training of health care personnel. Conclusions. Culturally competent communication must address diversity in language, education, and literacy skills. Acknowledgements. National Eye Institute (through Social & Health Services, Ltd.).

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Feb 12th, 12:00 AM

Many Eyes of Diabetes: Pilot Testing Culturally Competent Educational Materials for Underserved Populations

Objective. To pilot test culturally competent educational materials targeted at an underserved Haitian patient population with diabetes. Background. Culturally sensitive patient care to minority populations can potentially mitigate health care disparities. Methods. Patient education materials were created in English, French, and Creole. Ten subjects with diabetes who were fluent in Creole were recruited from the community. Participants were asked to (1) complete a demographic survey; (2) complete an oral preand post-test on knowledge about diabetes and the eye; (3) review a patient education video message; (4) read a patient education message or, at the participant’s request, have it read to them; and (5) answer questions about the cultural competency of the materials. A previous study of English speaking subjects served as the comparison group. Three optometric students of similar cultural background served as a focus group. Results. Ten female subjects with diabetes (mean age = 65 years) participated. Educational levels varied (6 ≤ 6th grade or equivalent, 3 secondary school; 1 College). Although the assessment of patient knowledge revealed misconceptions about diabetic eye disease, there were no significant differences between the study population and the comparison group (p > 0.05). Three dominant themes emerged from focus group feedback: (1) literacy; (2) patient-centered care; and (3) cross-cultural training of health care personnel. Conclusions. Culturally competent communication must address diversity in language, education, and literacy skills. Acknowledgements. National Eye Institute (through Social & Health Services, Ltd.).