College of Osteopathic Medicine Faculty Articles

Title

Main Partner's resistance to condoms and HIV protection among disadvantaged, minority women.

ISBN or ISSN

0363-0242

Publication Title

Women & Health

Volume

42

Issue

3

Publication Date / Copyright Date

1-1-2006

First Page

37

Last Page

56

DOI Number

10.1300/J013v42n03_03

Abstract

ABSTRACT. From a study of high-risk minority women, we examined data for a subgroup of 201 women who participated in a “male condom- focused” HIV prevention intervention, and who reported having attempted to convince their main partner to use condoms in the 3 months following intervention. Factors related to consistent condom use with a main partner post-intervention were not living with the partner, fewer sexual encounters, and no recent sexual encounter in which either partner was under the influence of drugs.At 3 months following intervention, factors related towomen’s future intentions to use condoms consistently with a main partner were: no recent sex while either partner was under the influence of drugs, and the woman’s desire to use condoms consistently with the partner. Main partner’s resistance to condoms was unrelated to consistent condom use or future intentions to use condoms consistently. Findings identify barriers to consistent condom use within primary relationships, a critical yet challenging focal point for HIV prevention interventions.

Disciplines

Medical Specialties | Medicine and Health Sciences | Osteopathic Medicine and Osteopathy

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mariafer/intellcont/Perrino_ Main Partners resistance to condoms and HIV protection among disadvantaged minority women-1.pdf

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