College of Osteopathic Medicine Faculty Articles

Title

Perceived Stress Mediates the Effects of Coping on the Quality of Life of HIV-Positive Women on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

Publication Title

AIDS and Behavior

Volume

8

Issue

2

Publication Date / Copyright Date

6-1-2004

First Page

175

Last Page

183

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between three HIV-specific coping strategies (cognitive coping strategies, denial, and religious coping) and quality of life (QoL) in 90 HIVC, predominately minority women on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Religious coping was unrelated to QoL; however, use of cognitive coping strategies was related to greater QoL, and denial was related to poorer QoL. Baron and Kenny’s model of mediation was then used to test perceived stress as a mediator of the relationships between denial and cognitive coping strategies and QoL. These relationships were both mediated by perceived stress. Results suggest that utilization of certain coping strategies may lessen or heighten perceptions of life stressfulness, thereby influencing QoL in this understudied population.

Disciplines

Medical Specialties | Medicine and Health Sciences | Osteopathic Medicine and Osteopathy

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