CEC Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

2016

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Engineering and Computing

Advisor

Thomas MacFarland

Committee Member

Amon Seagull

Committee Member

Delores Smiley

Abstract

The use of information technology to supplement and enhance teaching is prevalent in many higher education institutions (HEIs). HEIs throughout the United States have invested in course management systems (CMS); however, despite heavy investments, faculty use of such systems is limited. Many studies were conducted on the use of CMS in HEIs, but they concentrated on faculty use of such systems at non-Historically Black Colleges and Universities (non-HBCUs). Little has been done on the use of CMS in HBCUs. The goal of this study was to examine factors that affect faculty use of CMS in traditional courses at HBCUs. Facilitating conditions (infrastructural and technical support, training), computer efficacy, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and attitude toward technology were examined to see how they affect faculty use of CMS in private 4-year HBCUs. Additionally, this study used the survey methodology to collect information from faculty at eleven private 4-year HBCUs. The survey was designed using the Davis Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) instrument, which has been tested and estimated as valid and reliable for its usefulness in developing a predictive model on the acceptance of technology. Other factors that measure support, training, and self-efficacy were added to the survey. The intent of this study was to develop a predictive model on the factors that affect faculty use of CMS in traditional courses in private 4-year HBCUs. A Likert-type scale survey instrument was administered to faculty at the eleven private 4-year HBCUs via the Web. This study contributed to existing research on CMS. The findings of this study supported the TAM model; the infrastructural support, technical support, training and self-efficacy all predicted both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness toward CMS. It also found that both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness predicted attitude toward CMS, and finally both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness serve as mediators between infrastructural support, technical support, training, self-efficacy and attitude toward CMS. This study provided base knowledge on factors that affect use of CMS at HBCUs, and will help administrators and faculty at HBCUs use CMS more effectively.

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