CEC Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

2006

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Information Systems (DCIS)

Department

Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences

Advisor

Maxine S. Cohen

Committee Member

Getrude W. Abramson

Committee Member

Steven R. Terrell

Abstract

National technology standards drafted by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) are incorporated into the technology standards required of American public schools. The state board of education in Georgia instituted the Georgia Framework for Integrating TECHnology (InTech), which is a 50-hour training program that prepares teachers to help their students accomplish technology standards and performance objectives.

The goal of this study was to investigate the effects on teachers' computer self-efficacy, technology integration, current instructional practices, personal computer use and factors relating to use or non-use of computers in the curriculum after completing the Georgia Framework for Integrating TECHnology (InTech) training program. A causal comparative research design was employed in this study. The sample consisted of teachers in the Walton County School District in Georgia who had completed the InTech training program. Information was gathered using the Level of Technology Integration (LoTi) instrument and addendum questionnaire, the Computer Self-Efficacy instrument (CUSE), and semi-structured observations and interviews. One hundred and thirty three usable surveys were returned for a return rate of 53%. These were analyzed using correlation, multiple regression, ANOVA, and chi -square statistical methods and content analyses.

The results indicated that the variables, teachers' perception of the quality of InTech training (PQIT) and personal computer use (PCU) contributed significantly to teachers' computer self-efficacy (CSE); however current instructional practice (CIP) was not statistically significant. It was found that there were statistically significant differences in the level of contributions to CSE by the independent variables; however, there were no significant differences among the mean scores on teachers ' perception of the quality of InTech training received, CSE, ClP, PCU, and LoTi. There was a relationship between factors relating to lise and non-use of computers in the classroom and teachers ' CSE.

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