CEC Theses and Dissertations

Date of Award

1999

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences

Advisor

Getrude W. Abramson

Committee Member

Laurie Dringus

Committee Member

George K. Fornshell

Abstract

Adult students who experience difficulties in comprehending written (printed) language frequently are limited in their scholastic development and possible employment opportunities. These individuals, who represent a growing segment of the learning disabled population, include poor readers and dyslexics and they routinely seek help and remediation through various educational techniques. One remediation technique often used is "books on tape". Through books on tape, recorded spoken text is presented in a sequential manner to the remedial reader as he or she is reading the corresponding printed document. This dissertation reviewed the books on tape paradigm, and through the use of current computer technology and random access storage, created an interface to enable the remedial reader to correlate a relative position on a printed page to the corresponding, pre-recorded spoken text presented by the computer.

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