College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Alcohol, Expectancy, Cognitive Labeling and Mirth

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-1979

Keywords

Adolescent, Alcohol Drinking, Awareness, Cognition

Publication Title

Journal of Abnormal Psychology

ISSN

0021-843X

Volume

88

Issue/No.

6

Peer Reviewed

1

Abstract

Investigated the role of alcohol, expectancy, and cognitive labeling in producing positive emotional changes following moderate alcohol consumption. In a 2–3 factorial design, 96 male normal drinkers (undergraduates) were (a) given either an alcoholic (.45 g ethanol/kg) or a nonalcoholic beverage, (b) instructed that they were receiving either an alcoholic or a nonalcoholic beverage, and (c) either informed or not informed of common physical sensations that result from a moderate dose of alcohol. Ss were then exposed to humorous stimuli, and their laughter and self-reports of mood were measured. Hypotheses based on extensions to alcohol intoxication of the cognitive-attributional components of S. Schachter's (1964) theory of emotion were not supported. Although both instructing Ss that they had received alcohol and actually administering alcohol increased Ss' reports of positive affect, only the beverage content instruction influenced Ss' laughter. Implications for current conceptualizations of the emotional and behavioral effects of alcohol consumption are discussed.

DOI

10.1037//0021-843X.88.6.641