College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Stability of Neurocognitive Impairment in Different Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2007

Publication Title

Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders

ISSN

1420-8008

Volume

23

Issue/No.

2

Abstract

There has been increasing interest in delineating different cognitive subtypes of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). It remains unclear; however, the extent to which neuropsychological impairment associated with amnestic, nonamnestic, and amnestic+ subtypes of MCI remains stable over time. In this study, 70 persons meeting the criteria for MCI and 38 cognitively normal elderly subjects received a baseline neuropsychological evaluation and were reevaluated 1 year later. Our results indicated that 84.6% of the persons initially classified as amnestic, 75% of those classified as nonamnestic, and 80% of the persons classified as MCI+ evidenced stable or more pronounced neuropsychological impairment across the follow-up period. Less than 7% of the amnestic and amnestic+ cases had nonimpaired neuropsychological profiles at their reevaluation at 12 months, and 16.7% of the nonamnestic cases had nonimpaired neuropsychological test profiles at follow-up. Approximately 87% of the cognitively normal subjects at baseline continued to have unimpaired neuropsychological performance at follow-up. These results indicate that the presence of neuropsychological impairment is relatively stable over a 12-month follow-up period among different cognitive subtypes of MCI, although 15-25% of the cases did not exhibit the specific cognitive deficits that characterized their performance at baseline.