College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Stability of Different Subtypes of Mild Cognitive Impairment among the Elderly over a Two To Three Year Follow-Up Period

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2009

Keywords

Mild Cognitive Impairment, Longitudinal Prediction, Alzheimer’s Disease

Publication Title

Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders

ISSN

1420-8008

Volume

27

Issue/No.

5

Abstract

METHODS:

We classified 217 individuals with no cognitive impairment (NCI), amnestic MCI (aMCI) based on a single test (aMCI-1) or multiple tests (aMCI-2+), nonamnestic MCI (naMCI) based on a single test (naMCI-1) or multiple tests (naMCI-2+), or amnestic + nonamnestic MCI (a+naMCI), using their baseline neuropsychological test scores, and performed annual follow-up evaluations for up to 3 years.

RESULTS:

None of the subjects with aMCI-2+ reverted to normal during follow-up, with 50% of these subjects remaining stable and 50% worsening over time. Similarly, less than 20% of subjects with aMCI-2+ and a+naMCI reverted to NCI during the follow-up period, whereas 50% of aMCI-1 and 37% with naMCI-1 reverted to NCI during this same period.

CONCLUSION:

Reversion to NCI occurs much more frequently when the diagnosis of MCI is based on the results of a single neuropsychological test than when it is based on the results of more memory tests. In epidemiological studies and clinical trials the diagnosis of MCI will likely be more stable if impairment on more than one test is required for amnestic and/or nonamnestic domains.

DOI

10.1159/000211803