Biology Faculty Articles

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2014

Publication Title

BioMed Research International

ISSN

2314-6133

Volume

2014

Issue/No.

434072

First Page

1

Last Page

8

Abstract

Genetic factors, as well as environmental factors, play a role in development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been reported to be associated with NPC. To confirm these genetic associations with NPC, two independent case-control studies from Southern China comprising 1166 NPC cases and 2340 controls were conducted. Seven SNPs in ITGA9 at 3p21.3 and 9 SNPs within the 6p21.3 HLA region were genotyped. To explore the potential clinical application of these genetic markers in NPC, we further evaluate the predictive/diagnostic role of significant SNPs by calculating the area under the curve (AUC). Results. The reported associations between ITGA9 variants and NPC were not replicated. Multiple loci of GABBR1, HLA-F, HLA-A, and HCG9 were statistically significant in both cohorts (Pcombined range from 5.96 × 10−17 to 0.02). We show for the first time that these factors influence NPC development independent of environmental risk factors. This study also indicated that the SNP alone cannot serve as a predictive/diagnostic marker for NPC. Integrating the most significant SNP with IgA antibodies status to EBV, which is presently used as screening/diagnostic marker for NPC in Chinese populations, did not improve the AUC estimate for diagnosis of NPC.

Comments

© 2014 Xiuchan Guo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Additional Comments

National Cancer Institute contract #: HHSN26120080001E; National Natural Science Foundation of China grant #: 30672377; Zhejiang Provincial Top Key Discipline of Laboratory Medicine, Key Science and Technology Innovation Team of Zhejiang Province grant #: 2010R50048

ORCID ID

0000-0001-7353-8301

ResearcherID

N-1726-2015

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